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For many Southerners like Sean Brock, cornbread is a way of life. So when it comes to something so sacred, there can be a lot of heated debates on how to make the best cornbread. Here’s the evolution of Husk’s cornbread told by Sean himself:
“When we opened Husk, I knew that we had to serve cornbread. I Also knew that there is a lot of bad cornbread out there in the restaurant world, usually cooked before service and reheated, or held in a warming drawer. I won’t touch that stuff because, yes, I am a cornbread snob. My cornbread has no flour and no sugar. It has the tang of good buttermilk and a little smoke from Allan Benton’s smokeouse bacon. You’ve got to cook the cornbread just before you want to eat it, in a black skillet, with plenty of smoking-hot grease. That is the secret to a golden, crunchy exterior. Use very high heat, so hot that the batter screeches as it hits the pan. It’s a deceptively simple process, but practice makes perfect, which may be why many Southerners make cornbread every single day.”

What should you do with your leftover cornbread? Turn it into a magical breakfast milkshake, of course! Chef Ed Lee shows you how.